Here's How Much Your Dog Costs You Over its Lifetime

Indeed, while you can’t put a price tag on the companionship of a four-legged friend, you can—and should—map out how much your dog will cost you throughout his or her lifetime, experts say. You don’t want to reach a point where unexpected expenses force you to give up your beloved pup, or where they crowd out all other financial priorities.

 

Read the full article here: http://time.com/money/4884120/we-did-the-math-heres-how-much-your-dog-costs-you-over-its-lifetime/

 

Potential health risk forces dog food recall

A dog food product sold nationwide is being recalled due to a potential health risk. Blue Buffalo Company voluntarily recalled some of its BLUE Wilderness Rocky Mountain Recipe Red Meat Dinner Wet Food for Adult Dogs. The company says the product could have elevated levels of beef thyroid hormones. Ingesting high levels of beef thyroid hormones could cause weight loss, increase heart rate, restlessness and increased thirst and urination in dogs. Long-term effects include vomiting, diarrhea and rapid or difficult breathing. The FDA says it has taken one report of a dog showing symptoms. That dog has now fully recovered. The affected products have the UPC code 840243101153 and a best by date of June 7, 2019. If you have the product at home, the FDA says to stop feeding it to your pet, and contact your veterinarian. For more information on the recall, visit the Blue Buffalo website.

A dog food product sold nationwide is being recalled due to a potential health risk.

Blue Buffalo Company voluntarily recalled some of its BLUE Wilderness Rocky Mountain Recipe Red Meat Dinner Wet Food for Adult Dogs. The company says the product could have elevated levels of beef thyroid hormones.

Ingesting high levels of beef thyroid hormones could cause weight loss, increase heart rate, restlessness and increased thirst and urination in dogs. Long-term effects include vomiting, diarrhea and rapid or difficult breathing.

The FDA says it has taken one report of a dog showing symptoms. That dog has now fully recovered.

The affected products have the UPC code 840243101153 and a best by date of June 7, 2019. If you have the product at home, the FDA says to stop feeding it to your pet, and contact your veterinarian.

For more information on the recall, visit the Blue Buffalo website.

With Spring's arrival, be mindful of these symptoms & give us a call if anything seems off!

Did you know that pets get allergies too? The most common symptoms in dogs include:

- Itchy, red, moist or scabbed skin
- Increased scratching
- Itchy, runny eyes
- Itchy back or base of tail (most commonly flea allergy)
- Itchy ears and ear infections
- Sneezing
- Vomiting
- Diarrhea

With Spring's arrival, be mindful of these symptoms & give us a call if anything seems off! #IHAC #Springtime #pettips

Blood Count And Intestinal Health; Links To Your Dogs Hyperactivity

A group of researchers decided to study the blood count of hyperactive dogs. The evidences confirmed similar results to previous studies done on ADHD patients. The most common concerns in dogs are general fearfulness, sensitivity to noise and hyperactivity. If left unmanaged, this can have negative impacts on both the dog and its owner.

Professor Hannes Lohi's research group from the University of Helsinki and the Folkhälsan Research Centre investigated on the physilogical make up of impulsive dogs- specifically their blood count. The group performed their investigation in partnership with the LC-MS Metabolomics Centre of Biocentre Kuopio (University of Eastern Finland). The results confirm the presence of metabolites of phospholipids and particularly tryptophan. The blood profile of these aggressive dogs differ significantly from the blood counts of dogs in control. Similar results have been observed in patients with ADHD. The study was published September 29, 2016 in the Behavioral and Brain Functions journal.

 

"Behaviour and behavioural disorders often develop as a combination of hereditary and environmental factors, which makes studying them challenging. Metabolomics, or the study of the metabolism, provides us with new clues on the biological issues underpinning behavioural disorders while promoting genetic research. At the moment, metabolomics research in dogs is rare, and the purpose of this pilot study was to examine new approaches and attain information on any metabolic abnormalities associated with hyperactivity in dogs," Professor Lohi explained.

Abnormal Metabolic Blood Tests Cause Hyperactivity

The study determined the blood metabolites in impulsive and normal German Shepherds. The results reveal a link between their hyperactivity and decreased levels of phospholipids in the blood.

"We knew to expect this discovery from research on the human side, as several studies have recorded lower blood lipid and fatty acid levels in ADHD patients than in control groups. However, the causal relationship is not clear and requires further studies, particularly ones with more extensive research data. Our discovery supports the existing belief that human and canine diseases are similar, which suggests dogs can serve as excellent models for human illnesses," according to doctoral student Jenni Puurunen.

"It is significant that the dog's age, sex or fasting had little impact on the link between behaviour and metabolites. We also controlled for dietary changes by feeding all dogs the same food for two weeks before testing," explains Puurunen.

Intestinal Health And Its Effect On Dog's Behavior

Another important information revealed in the study was the negative correlation between hyperactivity and the tryptophan metabolites. Tryptophan is a vital amino acid. Tryptophan metabolites are solely produced when intestinal bacteria processes the tryptophan from the food. This information confirmed the differences in the bacteria found in the gut of hyperactive and normally behaved dogs. This discovery finds further significance in the links found between the brain and the intestines a few years back.

A Globally Unique Metabolomics Project Is Underway

Lohi's team released an article regarding the study of metabolomics of fearful dogs earlier this year. The article confirmed the differences of blood counts between dogs who are generally fearful and the fearless ones. A more extensive research is still necessary to confirm the pilot-stage findings. The group of researchers already released a collection of test samples to assess the metabolomics technology in partnership with the company Genoscoper. The system us aimed at providing an effective tool to manage and speed up genetic research, specifically, the ones concerning behavioral studies.

The research group performs the study as as part of a more detailed canine behavior project. Its goal is to identify hereditary and environmental factors that affect behavior. They are also seeking to determine metabolic changes that affect behavioral disorders and be able to find parallelisms to human diseases and their management as well

 

Full article:  http://www.itechpost.com/articles/75979/20170119/hyperactivity.htm

 

Check your garden often for Mushrooms...

With the rain we've had recently, you've probably seen mushrooms popping up all over the place. Did you know they can be dangerous for your dog? Local 8 News Anchor Lauren Davis shows us what to watch out for.

The rain has been falling, and that means mushrooms are sprouting. 
That could be harmful to your dog. Lisa Sulewski with Concord Veterinary Hospital says, "Some dogs will eat anything."

Read the full article here....

http://www.local8now.com/content/news/Mushrooms-can-be-bad-for-your-dog-390959631.html

Secondhand smoke: Dangerous for pets, too

Owners who smoke put their pets at risk for serious, life-threatening illnesses such as asthma and cancer, and one US group's new ad exposes that truth. Feline and canine lungs are similar to those of humans, so it's not surprising that companion animals are at risk of health consequences when their humans smoke, says veterinarian Elisabeth Snead. But she said people who may not be motivated to quit for their own health could find inspiration in their pets. A new US ad campaign is capitalizing on that idea, warning of "CATmageddon."

Full Story:

CBC.ca (Canada)

Popular plants that are poisonous to pets and other yard hazards

In some ways, having pets in your yard is like having young children in your home. You need to take precautions.

So how do you keep your landscape from harming your pet and your pet from harming your landscape? Let's explore the options.

Hazards

All of us likely grow plants that could be toxic to dogs or cats. The good news is, incidents of poisoning from plants are not common.

Human medications (prescription, over the counter and herbal) were the most common cause of pet poisoning calls to the ASPCA in 2014, followed by insecticides (particularly those applied to dogs and cats for flea control), household items (such as paints and cleaning products) and human food (onions, garlic, grapes and raisins for dogs, and xylitol, an artificial sweetener, which is toxic to animals.) Veterinarian medication overdoses and chocolate also were cause for concern.

Poisonous plants made up about five percent of the calls, followed by mouse and rat poison and lawn and garden products.  The plant calls involved mostly cats and house plants.

The ASPCA's website has an excellent list of plants poisonous to cats and dogs. The association also offers a free Animal Poison Control Center mobile app for download.

Azaleas, for instance, can be fatally toxic to dogs (and people, too). Obviously, dogs don't typically eat azaleas, although I was made aware of an incident involving a puppy left alone inside a house all day with a potted azalea. Unfortunately, that did result in death.

Dog owners should be on high alert for one plant: sago palm (Cycas revoluta). There are male sagos and female sagos, and it's the females that present the most dangerous situation. Although all parts of the plant are toxic, the seeds are highly poisonous to dogs, and there have been numerous fatalities over the years in Louisiana. Seeds from female sagos should be gathered and disposed of in spring.
Lilies also are highly toxic to cats.

While it's important to find out what plants are toxic, I'm not sure how far I would go to radically change an existing outdoor planting — such as rip out all of the azaleas — to eliminate all potentially toxic plants. But it's good to be aware of the dangers.

There are dozens and dozens of plants listed as toxic to dogs on ASCPA.org. The list includes many plants that are common in South Louisiana gardens, including the following:

  • American Holly
  • American Mandrake
  • American Yew
  • Andromeda Japonica
  • Asparagus Fern
  • Azalea
  • Bay Laurel
  • Begonia
  • Bird of Paradise
  • Caladium
  • Calla Lily
  • Chinaberry Tree
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clematis
  • Cutleaf Philodendron
  • DahliaDaisy
  • Elephant Ears
  • EnglishIvy
  • Fig
  • Gardenia
  • Geranium
  • Hibiscus
  • Hosta
  • Hydrangea
  • Lantana
  • Nandina
  • Oleander
  • Poinsettia
  • Rose of Sharon
  • Sago Palm
  • Sweet Potato Vine
  • Trumpet Lily
  • Vinca

Source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2016/03/plants_poisonous_to_pets_and_o.html

 

Study links secondhand smoke to pet heath risks

Pets exposed to secondhand smoke in the home are more likely to gain weight and develop cancer than animals in smoke-free homes, according to research by veterinarian Clare Knottenbelt of the University of Glasgow in the UK. Pets, especially cats, are particularly vulnerable to the effects of secondhand smoke because they spend so much time inside, grooming and in close contact with the carpet, where toxins accumulate.

Full story: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/pets-health/12073331/Second-hand-smoke-linked-to-pet-illnesses.html